Cawood History Timeline

1st-2nd
century

Romans lived on the river Wharfe at the junction with the river Ouse. Pottery found in the Caravan Park in 1930

937

King Athelstan gave Cawood to the See of York as thanks for his victory over the Vikings

963

King Edgar granted an estate at Sherburn to Archbishop Aeslac which included Cawood

1066

Viking boats moored on the River Ouse as far as the river Wharfe. Vikings slaughtered at Riccall on return to boats

1181

Roger de Pont L’Eveque first resident of Cawood Castle

1201

John de Cawoode held land in Cawood at Keesbury Manor

1235

Reference to the Bishopdyke at Rest Park, Biggin

1235

Earliest reference to the medieval garden on the Garth

1255

Henry III visited the Castle

1271

Archbishop Walter Gifford crenellated the Castle

1299 

Edward 1 moved his entire court to Cawood for 7 years in order to pursue the Scots

1302

David de Cawood petitioned the King for return of land to his manor in Cawood from the Archbishop of York

1314

Edward III stayed here with his wife Isabella after his defeat by Robert the Bruce at Bannockburn

1374

Cawood Castle transformed into a quadrangular castle

1385

York Minster took out an 80-year lease for stone from Huddleston Quarry, Sherburn. This was transported through Cawood to York along the Bishopdyke waterway

1426

John Kemp became Archbishop of York. During this time he built the Castle Gatehouse and Banqueting Hall

1466

A Great Feast to celebrate the inauguration of Archbishop George Neville brother of the Earl of Warwick who is said to have employed 2000 cooks

1514

Cardinal Thomas Wolsey became Archbishop of York

1530

Cardinal Wolsey visits Cawood and refurbishes the Castle. In November he is summoned to London by the King and dies on the way in Leicester

1541

Henry VIII visits with wife Catherine Howard, and her lover Thomas Culpepper, who a few months later were executed for adultery

1628

Archbishop George Mountain, born in Cawood, became Archbishop of York died soon after and is buried in Cawood Church

1642

Roundheads and Royalist soldiers
both held Castle in the Civil war

1646

Destruction of the castle with 6 other northern castles

1750

Payment made to pull down part of Cawood castle

1765

Cawood castle stone used at Bishopthorpe Palace

1852

Flour mill built in the village later became chocolate factory

1872

Bridge over the river Ouse constructed

1898

Selby to Cawood railway opened in the village

1906

Cawood school opened

1937

Planting chestnut trees Gill Green

1970

Gatehouse and Banqueting Hall were sold.

1981

Chocolate factory burns down

1982

Flood wall built

1984

Landmark Trust restored the Gatehouse and Banqueting Hall

1986

Castle Garth saved from development by the Great Crested Newt and bought by the village for community
use.

1987

Gill Green in the ownership of Cawood Parish Council

2000

Highest river levels ever recorded in the village luckily was held back by flood wall.

2003

Cawood Castle Garth Group formed to investigate the history of the Garth

2007

Cawood Sword given to the Yorkshire Museum. The Viking sword dated 1100 AD was found in the river Ouse
opposite the castle.

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